Writing a conclusion for Task 2 IELTS

Writing a conclusion for Task 2 IELTSWhen writing a conclusion for Task 2 IELTS, there are three main steps that you need to consider, as well as words that you should avoid. Watch the video and read the narration below to find out more.

Narration:

When writing a conclusion to your Task II essay, it is important to be clear about what you are trying to achieve. There are three main aims for writing a conclusion. You need to paraphrase your point of view on the topic. This does not mean that you should repeat what you have written, but you should give a short overview of your main ideas so your argument is clear to the examiner.

The second point is that a conclusion should ‘complete’ your essay. This means that when the examiner reads your final paragraph, it should be very clear that this is the point at which you intended to finish. Without a properly constructed conclusion, you could give the examiner the impression that you would have written more but didn’t have time.

The final aim of your conclusion is to demonstrate a familiarity with academic writing. This means that you need to show the examiner that you know the structure of an academic essay, with a clear introduction, body paragraphs and conclusion.

Useful tips for writing a conclusion for Task 2 IELTS

Avoid overused vocabulary. As with all academic writing, it is important to select appropriate vocabulary. When writing a conclusion, there are a number of words or phrases you can use. The most common phrase is, of course, In conclusion. However, as it is the most common, it is also the most overused. If you are looking for a high result in your IELTS test, it is important to demonstrate that you have a wider range of vocabulary than other candidates, so it is best to avoid using the more common expressions. Better options are To conclude, In brief, To summarise, Overall and Therefore.

Speculate or recommend. Another point that makes a good conclusion is by ending with either a speculation or a recommendation.

Speculation:

A speculation is when you consider what would happen if we do or if do not do something. Consider this example:

To conclude, education should definitely have a relevance to the future of the student, yet this does not have to be exclusively at a professional level. Without some exposure to the arts, we risk becoming purely productive without any sense of culture or appreciation of the society in which we live.

Here, the writer speculates that without some exposure to the arts, we risk becoming purely productive without any sense of culture or appreciation of the society in which we live.

Recommendation:

You could also conclude your essay with a recommendation, suggesting that we should or should not do something. Consider this example:

In summary, even though the rise in technology has undoubtedly led to vast improvements in our ability to transfer information, it has not significantly advanced our ability to interact on a social level. It would perhaps be more advantageous if we were to consider technological progress as an aid to business rather than a complete method of communication.

Here, the writer suggests that we should consider technology as an aid to business rather than a complete method of communication.

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