Using good intonation when reading aloud in the PTE test

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Using good intonation when reading aloud in the PTE testUsing good intonation when reading aloud in the PTE test is essential, so here are some notes about how punctuation can help you demonstrate good intonation. Make sure you have read the basic information about this question type before you begin!

It’s not common, but if you have a text with an exclamation mark, this should have a high or rising intonation.

Hyphenated words are read a little faster (company oriented > company-oriented)

A clause (information wrapped in commas that is not required for the grammar of the sentence) generally has a slightly lower volume and a different intonation (often deeper). For example: James, who is a friend of mine, has just passed his PTE test.

Lists often have a repeated intonation until the last in the list, which has a falling intonation. For example: ‘Some people are unable to work even if they want to, often as a result of local opportunities, lack of training, disabilities and transport concerns.’

Good intonation when reading aloud in the PTE test takes practice, so make sure to focus on the way people speak English just as much as what they are saying! One way that you can improve your intonation is to listen to a short recording (about 10 seconds), repeat what you hear (recording it on a mobile phone) and then compare the original recording and your response.


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