The past simple with TO BE

The past simple with TO BE. On the previous page, we looked at how to form the past simple by adding +ed or +d to the verb. For example: He played outside yesterday. He lived in New York for 2 years. On this page, we will look at what happens when we use the verb … Read more

The future simple with be going to

The future simple with be going to. To talk about the future in English, there are lots of different tenses you can use. One of the most common forms is (be) going to. Here are some examples: I am going to have lunch with John tomorrow. They are going to see a movie at the … Read more

Stative verbs and continuous tenses in English

Stative verbs and continuous tenses in English. Verbs can be divided in to two groups – stative verbs and dynamic verbs. Stative verbs talk about states – how you feel, what you see, what you like, what you hate. It is important to know the difference between stative and dynamic verbs because we generally do … Read more

The present continuous at CEFR Level A1

The present continuous at CEFR Level A1. In this lesson, we will look at the the present continuous. The present continuous is used to talk about what is happening now (or around now). For example: I am studying English grammar now. They are visiting friends at the moment. He is playing football right now. The … Read more

The differences between adjectives with ING and ED

The differences between adjectives with ING and ED. In this lesson, we will look at the difference between adjectives that end with ING and ED. Here are some examples: I think football is boring. I am bored by football. This book is interesting. I am interested in this book. When we are describing a thing … Read more

How to make uncountable nouns countable

How to make uncountable nouns countable. When making an uncountable noun countable, we often use a unit of measurement – a cup of, a bottle of, a piece of, a kilo of, a lump of. Here are the most common units of measurement (note that these units can be used with countable nouns too!). Useless … Read more

5 more rules for using countable and uncountable nouns

5 more rules for using countable and uncountable nouns. On this page, we will look at the differences between countable and uncountable nouns when used with some, no, any, many, and much. Let’s start with some and no. Rule #1. Use some when talking about more than one countable noun and with uncountable nouns in … Read more

Comparing 3 or more adjectives in English

Comparing 3 or more adjectives in English. When we compare one adjective to another adjective, we use comparative adjectives. When we compare 3 or more things in English, we superlative adjectives. For most adjectives, we can compare them by adding the +est to the sentence. We will look at this in much more detail in … Read more

Using a range of verbs for reported speech at Level B2

Using a range of verbs for reported speech at Level B2. We have already looked at reported speech in Level B1, with lessons on the 4 rules for reported speech as well as some additional information you need to know. On this page, we will further develop your skills by looking at the different reporting … Read more

More rules for reported speech at Level B1

More rules for reported speech at Level B1. We have already looked at the 4 rules for reported speech, so now we will look at some additional notes about reported speech. 1. Using ‘that’ in reported speech When reporting speech, you can add ‘that’ to the sentence. However, if you use common reporting verbs like … Read more